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The Facts About Protein and Strength

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How protein helps improve your strength and muscle mass

Protein is essential for anyone who is training for muscle growth and strength gains. There are a few reasons why, and it’s important to understand just how crucial protein intake is before you make any decisions over your nutrition.

The facts about protein

Protein is one of the vital nutrients that your body needs to survive. It’s used for many different functions in the body, including the growth and maintenance of muscle mass. When you eat protein, the body breaks it down into a variety of amino acids, which then perform their functions in special combinations.

Protein and your muscles

Protein is one of the vital nutrients that your body needs to survive. It’s used for many different functions in the body, including the growth and maintenance of muscle mass. When you eat protein, the body breaks it down into a variety of amino acids, which then perform their functions in special combinations.

Your protein balance

Developing strength and power means your body is under stress, and you are making greater demands from your muscles. Part of this process means that your body is trying to balance the amount of muscle breakdown that is happening with the amount of protein it can synthesise. If you don’t take in enough at these times, your body will begin to use up its stores of protein from existing tissues, making it harder to get the power increases you want. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and English Institute of Sport (EIS) recommend between 1 and 2 grams per kilogram of your bodyweight each day.

Essential amino acids

With the demands of strength and power training, you can’t ignore any aspect of nutrition. The amino acids of protein, for example, are divided into two categories: essential and non-essential. Despite the name, you need them all to thrive. Considering the facts about protein, there will also be the non-essential amino acids, which can be synthesized within the body, and so it isn’t strictly necessary to rely on dietary sources. Essentials, such as glutamine, can’t be made by your body and have to be taken in through your diet. We call the sources that contain the full range of amino acids ‘complete’ proteins. Eggs, lean meats and fish are all complete proteins, but MaxiNutrition protein shakes, milks and bars are definitely the most convenient item to take to the gym.

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